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POPs

IPEN Press Release

PFHXs, Used as a Substitute for Banned PFOS and PFOA, Recommended for Global Ban

(Rome, Italy) An U.N. expert committee decided unanimously to recommend a complete global elimination for another toxic fluorinated “forever chemical.” Fluorinated chemicals are widespread pollutants threatening drinking water sources, public health and the occupational health of firefighters. They do not break down in the environment and accumulate in the bodies of wildlife and people. They are used in a wide variety of products, including firefighting foam, waterproofing of textiles, and food packaging, as well as other industrial and consumer applications. 

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have received significant public and media attention in the US, EU, and Australia, in part due to their toxicity, extreme persistence, and documented water pollution. However, information about PFAS in other parts of the world is largely lacking and the information which is available is difficult to access.

Over the past few months, IPEN Participating Organizations in twelve Middle Eastern and Asian countries conducted surveys to explore possible PFAS uses and pollution sources, scientific studies and government actions, including under the Stockholm Convention. Countries covered include: Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Japan, Jordan, Lebanon, Malaysia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam.

It will promote data collection, analysis, information sharing, and knowledge management to inform decision making

Nairobi, Kenya

The government has formed a committee to tackle toxic and hazardous chemicals posing risk to Kenyans.

Globally, nations have put in place measures to manage chemicals through voluntary or legally binding instruments.

Toxic and hazardous chemicals are regulated under Montreal, Rotterdam, Minamata, and Stockholm Conventions.

Though not produced in Kenya, importation of chemicals, export and use is not specifically tracked.

For Immediate Release

Attn: News & Environment Editors
January 17, 2021
Contacts: Pamela Miller, pamela@akaction.org.org
Sara Brosché, PhD, sarabrosche@ipen.org
@ToxicsFree

 

U.N. Expert Committee Acts on Hazardous Chemicals in Plastics

Gothenburg, Sweden - A U.N. expert committee to the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) has evaluated two chemical additives to plastics and determined that only one qualifies to move forward in the process to be listed for global elimination under the Stockholm Convention.

The committee failed to reach a consensus that the flame retardant the chemical Dechlorane plus (DP) is likely, as a result of its long-range environmental transport, to lead to significant adverse human health and environmental effects, such that global action is warranted. DP is an example of a substance that never should have been produced as it is a slight modification of mirex – one of the original dirty dozen substances listed in the Convention. It has been produced since the 1960s and used in plastics for computers and televisions, coatings for wires and cables, and polyurethane foam. It has been found in human milk, serum, and cord blood and can cause neurotoxicity, liver impairment, and endocrine disruption.

“We are appalled that the Committee allowed a few individuals to de-rail progress toward elimination of this dangerous chemical and failed to consider properly the body of evidence on its adverse effects. It is critical that the global community swiftly eliminates the manufacturing and use of this dangerous chemical. Dechlorane plus is currently marketed as a replacement for the flame retardant decaBDE and as a substitute for mirex. This is a stark example of a regrettable, ill-advised substitution. Studies show rising levels of DP, perhaps indicating that DP is being increasingly used as a replacement for decaBDE. DP threatens the development and health of our next generations and concerted international action must be taken to prevent further harm,” said Pamela Miller, IPEN Co-Chair and Executive Director of Alaska Community Action on Toxics. The Committee will re-evaluate Dechlorane plus at its next meeting in September 2021.

https://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/tea/news/east-africa/toxic-pollutants-f...

Excerpted from The East African. Click here to read the report.

By PAULINE KAIRU

Eggs from chickens that forage around waste yards and plastic burning sites are a risk as they have been found to contain high levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs).

Studies carried out in Kenya and Tanzania found high levels of POPs in the eggs from such chickens, pointing to an environment polluted with chemicals, including banned and current-use plastic additives and chemicals created from burning plastics.

The study, “Plastic waste poisons the food chain in Kenya and Tanzania” was done to monitor persistent organic contaminants for human health and food.

In Kenya, the study was done with eggs produced by hens in the vicinity of a school community cooker in Mirema, Nairobi, that burns plastic waste for fuel. In Tanzania, it was carried out with free-range chicken eggs at households in Pugu Kinyamwezi located next to a large municipal solid waste dumpsite on the south-western edge of Dar es Salaam.

The study spearheaded by IPEN and local environment watchdogs — Centre for Environmental Justice and Development (CEJAD) in Kenya and Agenda for Environment and Responsible Development (Agenda) in Tanzania — found the eggs contained dioxins and POPs like brominated flame retardants.

Campaigners, scientists say Trudeau government showed 'bad faith' by using loophole on plastic waste

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-us-plastic-waste-basel-1.5827340

Environmental groups are accusing the Trudeau government of acting in bad faith after it quietly signed a bilateral agreement with the U.S. that could allow it to evade some of its obligations to stop shipping plastic waste to poor countries around the world.

This report gives an overview of the current situation of highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) in Jordan and describes the national pesticide registration and control policy framework, the pesticides in use in Jordan and general data on volume, threats of pesticide use to public heatlh, and more. It concludes with the recommendations that Jordan needs to:

National Association of Professional Environmentalists (NAPE) carried out this project in Uganda and it involved, among other things, a desk study and field work. The desk study revealed various aspects regarding the use of DDT in the country including where it was used, when it was used and why it was used. The field work involved moving from the office to visit different stakeholders to gather information on DDT and its use in Uganda. Data was collected from Kampala-based institutions, including:

Сколько мусоросжигателей, инсинераторных установок или крематоров находится в вашем городе или регионе? Что о них известно и какую опасность таят в себе эти технологии?

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