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Lead in Paint

While awareness of the hazards of lead in paint has grown, poor funding, local production, continued industrial use and a developed/developing country regulations gap have stymied progress towards its elimination, Ginger Hervey of Chemical Watch reports. Reprinted with permission, 27 October 2020.

Environmental health, child health advocates, governments, and paint industries are coming together this week from October 25 to 31 for the International Lead Poisoning Prevention Week of Action.

https://myrepublica.nagariknetwork.com/news/stakeholders-urge-government...

KATHMANDU, Oct 30: Environmental health, child health advocates, governments, and paint industries are coming together this week from October 25 to 31 for the International Lead Poisoning Prevention Week of Action.

For Immediate Release

ATTN: Global News, Environment, Health Editors
24 October 2020

Contacts: Jeiel Guarino, jeielguarino@ipen.org, Sara Brosché, sarabrosche@ipen.org

The Philippines marks this year’s International Lead Poisoning Prevention Week (ILPPW) with the historic phase-out of paints containing lead additives as backdrop.

https://asiapacificcoatingsjournal.com/news/philippines-beats-2020-phase-out-deadline-for-lead-containing-paints

The ILPPW, which will take place from October 25th until the 31st, is an initiative of the UN-backed Global Alliance to Eliminate Lead Paint with this year’s edition focusing on the need to accelerate progress towards the global phase out of lead paint through regulatory and legal measures.

IPEN participating organizations in 36 countries are taking part in the 8th edition of the International Lead Poisoning Prevention Week on October 25 to 31. This year’s campaign focuses on the need to hasten progress toward the global goal of phasing out lead paint through regulatory and legal measures. The Week of Action is spearheaded by the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lead Paint, which is jointly led by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Health Organization (WHO) and which counts on IPEN and many of its POs from developing countries among its partners. What follows is a brief summary of our POs’ planned activities for the week-long campaign to raise awareness about the hazards and risks of lead, especially on the health of children and other vulnerable groups, and to mobilize stakeholders’ support for the enactment of strong lead paint laws and their effective enforcement.

Read the original press release from the Network for a Carcinogen-Free Society and IPEN in Korean

This is a press release from the Network for a Carcinogen-Free Society and IPEN. The Network for a Carcinogen-Free Society includes the following groups: Citizens' Action to Create Gunsan without Carcinogens; Civil Action to Create Ulsan without Carcinogens; Coalition of Health and Medical Organizations to Realize the Right to Health; Pharmaceutical Society for a Healthy Society; Dental Society for a Healthy Society; Labor Health Alliance; Humanitarian Practitioner Council; Young Korean Medical Association for the Realization of True Medicine; Green Alliance; Child Health National Solidarity; iCOOP Seoul Council; Korean Women's Environmental Network; Wonjin Foundation; Environment Health Research Institute; National Metal Workers' Union; Korean Confederation of Trade Unions; National Parents' Association for True Education; Green Education Solidarity; Blue Gwangmyeong 21 Action Council; Environmental Movement Alliance; and Environmental Justice.

On September 25, 2020, the Seoul Metropolitan Government announced that it would sign a “multilateral agreement on the use of lead-reducing paint that complies with international standards”. The main focus is to use products with excellent safety and low lead content below the recommended level of the World Health Organization (WHO) in city-managed facilities and public places. The agreement includes five paint manufacturers, the Korea Paint Ink Industry Cooperative, Seoul Facilities Corporation, SH Corporation, and the Green Seoul Citizens' Committee. This is a valuable fruit of civil society organizations that have been working for a safe environment for children from harmful substances, paint manufacturers that manufacture safe products, and Seoul's efforts to make Seoul safe from harmful substances.

According to the Seoul Metropolitan Government, through this agreement, less than 0.009% (90ppm) lead in the interior and exterior of public facilities managed by the Seoul Facilities Corporation and public housing sold, rented, and managed by the Seoul Housing and Urban Corporation (SH) comply with international standards. Only paints containing this will be used.

Initial Study to Understand the Existence of Lead Paint Used in Preschool and in the Child's Family in Hai Hau District, Nam Dinh Province, Vietnam, a study conducted by Research Centre for Gender, Family and Environment in Development (CGFED), in coordination with the Department of School Hygiene and Health, National Institute of Occupational and Environmental Health (NIOEH).

Impact will be felt in Asia Pacific region and the rest of the world

(Shenzhen, China) – The People’s Republic of China, one of the largest and fastest growing paint producing countries in the world, has established new health protective standards for lead in paint. Because China is Asia’s largest paint producer and has nearly one-third of the global market for paints, the new regulations will have important health ramifications not only in China, but throughout Asia and the rest of the world. The new standards will take effect December 1, 2020.

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