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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

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Lead in Paint

Impact will be felt in Asia Pacific region and the rest of the world

(Shenzhen, China) – The People’s Republic of China, one of the largest and fastest growing paint producing countries in the world, has established new health protective standards for lead in paint. Because China is Asia’s largest paint producer and has nearly one-third of the global market for paints, the new regulations will have important health ramifications not only in China, but throughout Asia and the rest of the world. The new standards will take effect December 1, 2020.

Para limitar el contenido de plomo en recubrimientos y pinturas, y prohibirlo en artículos destinados al uso infantil, el senador Ricardo Monreal presentará una iniciativa que establezca un máximo de ese metal en la elaboración de dichos productos.

https://morena.senado.gob.mx/2020/08/05/ricardo-monreal-propone-limitar-...

Para limitar el contenido de plomo en recubrimientos y pinturas, y prohibirlo en artículos destinados al uso infantil, el senador Ricardo Monreal presentará una iniciativa que establezca un máximo de ese metal en la elaboración de dichos productos.

From November 2, 2019 to February 25, 2020, 87 cans of spray paints intended for consumer or general use were purchased by the EcoWaste Coalition from paint, home improvement, general merchandise and office and school supplies stores in 20 cities (12 in Metro Manila and eight other cities in Batangas, Benguet, Cavite, Laguna, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga, Rizal, and Zambales provinces) and one municipality (Baliuag, Bulacan).

For Immediate Release

Quezon City, Philippines/Gothenburg, Sweden: A new report by the environmental health groups EcoWaste Coalition and International Pollutants Elimination Network (IPEN) finds spray paints with dangerous lead concentrations on sale in the Philippines in violation of the country’s law banning lead in paints.

Environmental group EcoWaste Coalition on Tuesday urged the Department of Education to screen the schools’ facilities for lead paint hazard which can affect the children’s developing brains and behavior while they are closed due to the COVID-19 scare.

by Faye Leone, Content Editor, SDGs and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (US)

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • NGOs in five countries studied playground equipment as part of their participation in the International Pollutants Elimination Network, and found lead levels as high as 100,000 ppm in the equipment paint.
  • The recommended limit by UNEP is 90 ppm.
  • IPEN is calling for lead paint bans to include industrial paint on outdoor equipment, not only decorative paint, to protect children's health.

Children’s playgrounds in Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, the Philippines and Thailand commonly contain painted equipment with lead levels above 90 ppm, the recommended limit by UN Environment Program (UNEP). Organizations in each country studied playground equipment as part of their participation in the International Pollutants Elimination Network (IPEN), a group of NGOs working to prevent toxic chemicals from harming human health and the environment.

Quezon City.  The phase-out of all types of lead-containing paints in the Philippines is an excellent example of a successful chemical policy directive aimed at preventing and reducing children’s exposure to lead, a highly toxic substance, from paints.

Report shows paints being sold in Kenya in 2017 had dangerously high amounts of lead

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