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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Heavy Metals

IPEN Participating Organization Arnika, based in the Czech Republic, recently found concentrations of toxic substances in several samples of commonly available summer shoes and drinking glasses. Chemical analysis was commissioned of footwear and printed glasses, and DEHP and DiBP, which are phthalates especially hazardous for human hormonal and reproductive systems, were found in the shoes, as well as lead. Children's shoes specifically were tested, because children are particularly vulnerable to the hazards of phthalates and heavy metals.

http://www.natlawreview.com/article/swa-announces-new-chemical-database-...
National Law Review
29 August 2016
 
REACH Committee Approves Authorization For Lead Pigments Despite NGOs' Efforts
 

Press Release: EcoWaste Coalition, a non-profit watch group tracking toxic chemicals in products and wastes, lauded fast food giant McDonald’s Philippines for voluntarily recalling promotional back packs, sling bags and bag tags that contain lead, a hazardous substance.

The voluntary recall will be conducted starting today August 26 until October 24, 2016 by suppliers MZM Souvenirs and F Colors with McDonald’s full support and cooperation as announced by Golden Arches Development Corp., the master franchise holder of McDonald’s restaurants in the Philippines.   

The recall was the outcome of the EcoWaste Coalition’s chemical investigation showing lead in the accessible substrate material of the black back pack as it reported to McDonald’s Philippines and US last August 8.

العربية / English / español / русский / français

In the run-up to the 2nd United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA2), which will take place 23 - 27 May, 2016 in Nairobi, Kenya, IPEN has released its Views of Selected Issues at UNEA2. This document is a summary statement of some IPEN views about issues that will be taken up at the UNEA2, including: stakeholder engagement, sound management of chemicals and wastes, lead and cadmium, lead battery recycling, sustainable consumption and production, and marine plastic debris and micro plastics.

This document and additional information about IPEN's activities at UNEA2 can be found on this IPEN webpage. 

中文 (Chinese)

(Beijing, China) A new study on lead in decorative paints sold in China released today by Insight Explorer and IPEN finds that more than half of the paints analyzed exceed Chinese lead regulations. Moreover, even when paint brands offer paint with lower levels of lead, consumers have no way of knowing it because very few of 141 paint cans analyzed in the study carried information about lead content on the label.

“The health impacts of lead exposure on young children’s brains are lifelong, irreversible and untreatable,” said Pan Qingan, Project Director of China Heavy Metal Pollution Map. “We are limiting our children and our nation’s future intellectual development even though safe and effective alternatives are already in use and widely available in China. We must reduce this critical source of lead exposure to young children.”

This report presents the results from a study of the total lead content of solvent-based enamel decorative paints available on the market in China. Although China already implemented regulations controlling lead content of paint for interior and decorative use in 2001, two studies since then (both published in 2009) showed that many solvent-based decorative paints still contained high levels of lead. This study was undertaken with an aim to increase information about the lead content of solvent-based enamel decorative paints available on the market in China in 2014.

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