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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Chemicals in products

Global Call to Action on Antimicrobials from Scientists Published Today

Contact:
Avery Lindeman, Green Science Policy Institute at 520. 241.6118; avery@GreenSciencePolicy.org
Arlene Blum, Green Science Policy Institute and UC Berkeley at 510. 919.6363, Arlene@ArleneBlum.com
Green Science Policy Institute: (510) 898-1739 or (510) 898-1704

BERKELEY, CA:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/photo-essays/2017-06-15/these-women-are-p...

Workers in Asian factories might still be exposed to chemicals banned in the U.S. 25 years ago. Photographs by Anastasia Taylor-Lind for Bloomberg Businessweek.

To the Minjoo Party of Korea: We represent international networks that have been focusing for many years on human rights, occupational health and environmental health in the global electronics industry. We stand in solidarity with SHARPS during their historic 600+ day sit-in at Samsung.  

The recent framework agreement signed by the Minjoo Party and SHARPS (see below) provides key objectives for worker safety policies including right-to-know, protecting sub-contractor workers, and strengthening enforcement and penalties to increase corporate accountability. 

Pasay City/Quezon City.  A visiting expert from US today drew attention to the emerging concerns around the environmental impacts of microplastics in cosmetics at the ongoing beauty trade show in Pasay City.

Expert says antibacterials are no more effective than plain soap and water in reducing disease

Quezon City.  A non-profit toxics watch group urged consumers to refrain from using antibacterial soaps and washes containing triclosan and triclocarban as a historic ban in US on such products looms.

At UN chemicals meeting, political will clashes with narrow commercial interests

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Geneva: Governments at the Stockholm Convention 8th Conference of the Parties (COP8) agreed to add three toxic chemicals to the treaty, but granted extensive loopholes for two of them. The chemicals are DecaBDE, SCCPs, and HCBD.1 All three chemicals are persistent, highly toxic, travel long distances and build up in the food chain. Loopholes were granted for DecaBDE and SCCPs and recent IPEN studies found both substances in children’s toys.2 A small group of countries rejected proposals to at least label new products containing the substances. Countries and consumers concerned about contaminated products will have no information about their content.

“This is the beginning of the end for DecaBDE, SCCPs, and HCBD,” said Dr. Olga Speranskaya, IPEN Co-Chair. “We urge governments to move quickly to prohibit these substances and not prolong harm through the use of exemptions.”

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