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A Toxics-Free Future

Highlights Front Roll

Nepal's Standard on Toxic Substances in Children’s Products Should Be Enforced
New ACAT Report Addresses Effects of PFAS Chemicals on the Endocrine System
Working to Eliminate Harm to Human Health & the Environment from Toxic Chemicals
IPEN Regional Meeting for Southeast & East Asia

This report (anglais et français), conducted by Centre de Recherche et d’Education pour le Développement (CREPD) in partnership with IPEN, presents new data on the total lead content of solvent-based paints for home use available on the market in Cameroon. It also presents background information on why the use of lead paint is a source of serious concern, especially to children’s health; a review of national policy frameworks that are in place to ban or restrict the manufacture, import, export, distribution, sale and use of lead paint, and provides a strong justification to adopt and enforce further regulatory controls in Cameroon. Finally, it proposes action steps by different stakeholders to protect children and others from lead paint.

A new paper, NGO Practical Guide on Chemicals in Products Programme implementation, has been prepared jointly by IPEN, ISDI / SDPI and IndustriAll Global Union. It was part of the initiatives of the Chemicals in Products (CiP) Steering Group approved at the CiP meeting in Brasilia in February 2017. The CiP Steering Group is mandated to advise the United Nations Environment's Chemicals in Products Programme on the development and implementation of the project.

This study, conducted by Centre for Environment Justice and Development (CEJAD) in partnership with IPEN, presents new data on the total lead content of solvent-based paints for home use available on the market in Kenya. It also presents background information on why the use of lead paint is a source of serious concern, especially to children’s health; a review of national policy frameworks that are in place to ban or restrict the manufacture, import, export, distribution, sale and use of lead paint; and provides a strong justification to adopt and enforce further regulatory controls in Kenya. Finally, it proposes action steps by different stakeholders to protect children and others from lead paint.

IPEN Participating Organization MAMA-86 organized a press briefing with Ukraine’s Ministry of Health today in Kiev entitled: “Health without compromises – Ukraine’s Ministry of Health prohibits the use of asbestos and products containing it” to announce that Ukraine had formally banned asbestos. The event was addressed by Oksana Syvak, Deputy Minister for Public Health and European Integration, Olga Tsyguleva, Coordinator of the Program on Chemical Safety for MAMA-86, and Oleksil Shumilo, Head of Kharkiv City NGO “EcoPravo-Kharkiv.”

The National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea has paid meaningful attention to the hazardous conditions in the semi-conductor industry by hosting Supporters of Health and Rights of People in the Semi-Conductor Industry (SHARPs) and IPEN for a premiere of the new documentary film, "Stories from the Clean Room.” In preparation for the film premiere, IPEN Senior Science and Technical Advisor Joseph DiGangi, PhD wrote an article that appeared in the Korean media outlets OhMyNews and MediaToday. The main purpose of the article was to introduce the international concern about toxic exposure and occupational health and safety that has been generated by the deaths and grave illnesses of former Samsung workers.

To the Minjoo Party of Korea: We represent international networks that have been focusing for many years on human rights, occupational health and environmental health in the global electronics industry. We stand in solidarity with SHARPS during their historic 600+ day sit-in at Samsung.  

The recent framework agreement signed by the Minjoo Party and SHARPS (see below) provides key objectives for worker safety policies including right-to-know, protecting sub-contractor workers, and strengthening enforcement and penalties to increase corporate accountability. 

First ever peer-reviewed study on the economic burdens of mercury exposure near sources named in the Minamata Convention

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27594689

For Immediate Release

Göteborg, Sweden: Developing and transition countries stand to lose millions of dollars in earning potential every year due to mercury contamination, according to a new study published in The Journal of Environmental Management.[1] The analysis, led by noted researcher Dr. Leonardo Trasande, MD, MPP, is the first peer-reviewed study to estimate economic losses due to diminishing IQ resulting from mercury contamination in these countries.

The study evaluated mercury concentrations in hair samples from 236 participants from 17 sites in 15 countries, and estimated an annual loss of $77 - $130 million USD to these specific communities. All study participants lived near highly toxic mercury sources named in the Minamata Convention, the international treaty that obligates parties to take actions to minimize and eliminate mercury pollution to protect human health and the environment. On May18th, the Convention reached the 50-country ratification milestone and will become international law August 16th.

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